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Using our holistic approach we illustrate how the decisions you make can have an impact on areas of your finances  that you may not have realized were connected.




What's New with FFP Wealth Management?


By Roger C. Kruse

ROBERT POWELL

April 4, 2014, 5:01 a.m. EDT

 

Retirement experts call it a game changer for the 50 or so million households in the U.S. that own an individual retirement account — an IRA.

Uncle Sam’s Tax Court just ruled that the one-rollover-per-year rule applies to all of a taxpayer’s IRAs rather than to each IRA separately. And that ruling, say experts, is in direct conflict with IRS Publication 590, the bible for IRAs.

“Industry leaders, financial advisers, and everyone else who handles IRAs are stunned,” said Denise Appleby, the editor and publisher of The IRA Authority

According to Appleby, there are two ways to move money between IRAs.

1.    Transfers, which are not reported to the IRS and not reported on a tax return. The IRA owner never touches the money. You can do this as often as you like, whenever you like, Appleby said.

2.    And rollovers. With this method, the IRA owner takes the money as a distribution and they have 60-days to rollover (put back) the amount in an IRA. And this, you can do only once per 12-month period, said Appleby.

According to Appleby, the IRS, through their publications and regulations, has said for at least 20 years that the rollover method applies on a “per-IRA” basis. In other words, if you have 10 IRAs, you can do 10 rollovers for the year (12-month period), as long as an IRA does it only once (or the year).

Here’s the guidance found in Publication 590 , which everyone viewed as gospel: